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A. avic wont let go of tongs during feeding

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by J0urney, Sep 14, 2019.

  1. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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  2. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    A t doesn't know what tongs are...its either thinking its prey, or a branch or something....They don't know there's a human holding it or what metal is....lol
     
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  3. J0urney

    J0urney Arachnopeon Active Member

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    Thank you, I think thats thats the case too but man does she want the tongs
     
  4. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    Here's the thing...you have an avic.....the only time a its in danger from a cricket or feeder, is during or just after the molt....because avics molt in cacoons and at elevated positions, they are protected from feeders...so you can actually just let crickets roam free without concern. This is just for avics and their cousins though.

    It is a risk....look at it like this...kids can play on roof tops and generally be just fine (I did it as a kid), but some will fall and be seriously hurt...because these injury numbers are fairly low, should we just relent and let kids play on rooftops whenever without concern? Of should we just not let kids play on rooftops?

    I can say, if you ever had to nurse a t through a broken fang incident, you will know its something you want to avoid at all costs.

    And as mentioned, running up the tongs is also a serious risk, and you never know when that will happen.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
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  5. J0urney

    J0urney Arachnopeon Active Member

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    Thank you, thats a realy good analogy. As I said im not going to tong feed anyone except for my male but he could die at any second. Its been a while since he molted into a male and he doesn't have much longer left.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 15, 2019
  6. Teal

    Teal Arachnoemperor Old Timer

    This is also a stupid analogy. Guys, come on lol

    To the OP: Your T is not capable of higher thinking. It does not know what you are, what tongs are, etc. To a T, anything in its environment is either food or not food. And generally, things that move ARE food. You, as the human, know that tongs are inedible. So it is your responsibility as the higher-thinking mammal to not confuse your T into grabbing something *potentially* harmful. How common are broken fangs? I have never had my Ts break a fang. How common is it that Ts run up peoples' arms? I have had that happen a time or two. Tong feeding is like handling a T... the benefit is all for you, the human, while the T is the one at risk.

    Your Avic is NOT going to be eaten by crickets, though. If you drop a cricket in and are worried about it not being immediately eaten, put a bit of carrot or a dog food kibble down too.

    The reason why beginners aren't told about tong fed or handling is because those are things that maybe didn't occur to every new owner. Even if you say not to do them, now that person is going to be curious and probably try it. Better that they become more familiar with the hobby before encountering those controversial topics.
     
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  7. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    I don't know about this @Teal we may need to do some NSF-funded Nobel prize winning research in order to determine this, it could take decades OR use critical thinking because the gov't can't afford anything anymore...shoot, we are in deep you know what on this issue!
     
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  8. EtienneN

    EtienneN Arachnonovelist-musician-artist Arachnosupporter

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  9. Teal

    Teal Arachnoemperor Old Timer

    If anyone can solve this, it's you and me :cool:
     
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  10. Angelo303

    Angelo303 Arachnopeon Active Member

    what about if its an arborial avicularia female who wont come down it just stays from the half of the enclosure up?
     
  11. Feral

    Feral Arachnosquire Active Member

    I have forceps-fed a few times before, but I stopped. Here's why.
    In addition to all the excellent reasons to abstain from feeding with forceps already laid out by others here, especially where safety is concerned for both animal and human animal, here's another reason to consider:
    Unless a creature has a legit reason to need assisted feeding, you're depriving him of the opportunity to exercise his most primal instinct... to hunt! I mean tarantulas don't ask much from this world, or from us... a suitable and safe environment to build a home, some water, to possibly breed if the opportunity maybe arises, and stuff to kill and eat. Depriving them of the opportunity to hunt seems like stealing an important part of their life away.

    Plus again, yeah, all the risks for everyone involved.
    So that's how I see it.
     
  12. ThorsCarapace22

    ThorsCarapace22 Arachnosquire Active Member

    Avics will always roam. Just because you don't see her walking around the bottom doesn't mean that she don't travel down town every now and then ; ) if the food is still there the next day always remove it and try next week : )