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4 slings on the way! :D

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by nicodimus22, Jan 10, 2017.

  1. nicodimus22

    nicodimus22 Arachnosquire Active Member

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    I've had a Grammostola pulchra and pulchripes for over 3 years, and am much more comfortable with them now and I'm ready for more. (Initially, I was a little nervous about having a T for a pet, so I started with little slings.) After much research, I ordered 4 slings, which arrive tomorrow. My new babies:

    B. boehemi
    B. albopilosum
    N. tripepii
    P. sazimai

    I find all of these species to be quite beautiful in their own way. I'm sure that some people would roll their eyes and find them boring, but NW terrestrials are a good fit for me. I'm aware that the P. sazimai and N. tripepii are likely to be faster and more fiesty than the Grammostolas I'm used to, so I'll be especially careful until I have more experience with them.

    The only kind of more difficult T that I'm tempted by is P. irminia, but everything I've read makes it look like a giant leap in speed and aggressiveness that I'm not ready to take on.
     
  2. gypsy cola

    gypsy cola Arachnosquire Active Member

    When it comes to "aggressive", if you have a catch cup, tongs, and properly set up enclosures you are more likely to get threat display from a NW terrestrial. I have gotten more threat displays by my b.vagans than my entire OW collection combined. ( I own 7 currently, will be 9 next paycheck)
     
  3. Rittdk01

    Rittdk01 Arachnosquire Active Member

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    I have a spiderling N tripepii and a 3" b albo. Both are very good eaters and are growing fast. I got the curly around thanksgiving for $10 and she molted out female. Very good tarantulas :)
     
  4. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoprince Active Member

    no tarantula is boring. ;)
     
    • Agree Agree x 7
  5. cold blood

    cold blood Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Tripepii are nice, theyre way too uncommon....i just picked up a few before christmas....very cool species.

    If you want to make that leap to speed (id bet your more than ready), get cambridgei instead of irminia. Irminia are ghosts, cams are much more visible, and have even better growth rates and appetite. Theyre IMO the perfect stepping stone species.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  6. cold blood

    cold blood Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Especially not to people here.


    Weeeeelllll, maybe a rose hair qualifies.;)
     
    • Funny Funny x 6
  7. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoprince Active Member

    no way, my venomous gray rock is my baby.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
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  8. nicodimus22

    nicodimus22 Arachnosquire Active Member

    Well, I'm not as worried about threat displays as I am something very fast and willing to bite with somewhat potent venom. Some of the bite reports I've read on the p. irminia makes me go "NOPE."
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
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  9. Jeff23

    Jeff23 Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

    My Psalms are just little cuties. They just want a cricket to eat. They mean no harm.

    EDIT* Of course I am kidding about the harm. It is like connecting the dots to decrease the risk of getting bitten (along with patience and timing). So far it has worked well but my first ones (P Pulchers) are just reaching juvenile stage.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
  10. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    They are remarkably fast. Defensive sure, they stand their ground some. But their walking is not down slowly at all. If you like the speed of the species you have the past 3 yrs, then a Psalmo is not for you. Remember, not every T is for everyone, there's no shame in NOT owning a species. Nor does one need to collect all the popular species that people own/talk about etc.

    For example, I doubt I'll own any species out of China at the moment. I don't find the species all that attractive or interesting. There are other species I don't care to own because of their speed or some other reason.

    Just get what you like and enjoy.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
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  11. nicodimus22

    nicodimus22 Arachnosquire Active Member

    The GF was the most interested in the tripepii out of all the ones I showed her photos of (which I had pre-screened for species that I liked the look of and thought I would do a good job taking care of.) She'll be happy to see that I snagged one.

    This could always change, but I don't know that I'm ever going to want an arboreal or old world T. I appreciate the advice, though.
     
  12. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX Arachnoking Active Member

    Bravo. They are easy to care and quite benign Theraphosidae. If I can suggest, buy a P.cambridgei before a P.irminia (more reclusive, more prone to "attack") if you want to jump into those arboreal genus. P.cambridgei are class, easy to keep, not so defensive... a perfect step, IMO.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  13. obie

    obie Arachnosquire

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    Great choices you have there. You can't go wrong with any of those
     
  14. nicodimus22

    nicodimus22 Arachnosquire Active Member

    Well, FedEx delivered about an hour ago. 3/4 Ts survived the trip. The P. sazimai had a ruptured abdomen, which I was able to see before even opening the container it was in. I had to stick something into the remains to prove that it was DOA to the breeder. I'm working with him on a decision on what to do next.

    Has anyone else ever seen a ruptured abdomen during shipping? The inside of the box was slightly cool, almost room temperature, and it was 49 degrees out, so I don't know that it was temperature related. The other T in the same box was fine.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. nicodimus22

    nicodimus22 Arachnosquire Active Member

    Update: I am having another P. sazimai sent on Friday. The replacement was free, but the $45 to ship it is mine to pay. (This is the policy with every breeder I've seen.) The breeder assured me that slings arriving with a ruptured abdomen is something that almost never happens. He feels it may have been trauma from changes in pressure in the cargo bay of the plane. <shrug> No idea.

    I was offered a freebie, a Neoholothele incei gold, but I declined. Too webby for me, and probably too fast.

    I'll get some pics together once I have all four to show, but there's not much to see...they're all smaller than a pea, and have the same orange-ish bodies.
     
  16. ledzeppelin

    ledzeppelin Arachnobaron

    Jesus Christ that's some expensive slings :eek: 45$ only shipping? >< Glad I live in EU lol :D I can get all those slings + shipping for under 40$ here XD
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  17. ledzeppelin

    ledzeppelin Arachnobaron

    Also I doubt that pressure changes can rupture a T's abdomen.. It was probably poorely packed.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  18. nicodimus22

    nicodimus22 Arachnosquire Active Member

    The sling was only $18.99. Overnight shipping in the states is $40-$45 regardless of how many you get at a time, so it's more cost effective to get a few at a time.
     
  19. ledzeppelin

    ledzeppelin Arachnobaron

    Wow P. sazimai is like 5$ here :eek: I mean most of slings up to 5i can mostly be bought for under 10-15$.. Well overnight shipping is like 12$ inside a country.. Im not sure how much is international.. But it's definitely not so expensive :eek: You guys have it tough :D But your wage is higher in average anyway so.. i guess it's fair :p
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  20. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX Arachnoking Active Member

    Eh eh u lovely dastard :kiss: